That’s a lot of Herbal Tinctures
That’s a lot of Herbal Tinctures
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What does it take to make tinctures? What is a tincture? A tincture is typically an extract of plant or animal material dissolved in ethanol. Solvent concentrations of 25–60% are common, but may run as high as 90%. In chemistry, a tincture is a solution that has ethanol as its solvent.

What is the most common alcohol used when making a tincture?  VODKA!

Although it doesn't need to be.

A tincture is typically an extract of plant or animal material dissolved in ethanol. Solvent concentrations of 25–60% are common, but may run as high as 90%. In chemistry, a tincture is a solution that has ethanol as its solvent.

To capture the widest range of both water soluble and alcohol soluble constituents, we recommend working with an alcohol that is between 40-60% ABV (80-120 proof). Most vodka, brandy, rum and gin falls perfectly within that range.

 

Personally I have used Everclear 151.  It worked fantastic.  In some states it is illegal though for such high alcohol content.  It'll burn your throat if took a shot of it as it is so potent.  Just imagine how Everclear 190 is.

Making a tincture is quite simple.  You just need patience as it takes a long time.

  1. Fill your glass jar half way with your herb(s) of choice
  2. Fill the jar to the top with your alcohol
  3. Place a piece of parchment paper over the mouth of the jar, and then cap the jar with a metal lid
  4. Allow the tincture to macerate (infuse/sit) for 4-6 weeks, shaking daily for at least the first week
  5. When you’re ready to strain, layer a few pieces of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar and pour the tincture out into either a second clean jar or a large bowl.  Get as much alcohol out of the herbs as you can by gathering up the cheesecloth and squeezing strongly until most of the liquid is out of the herbs
  6. You can either store your tincture in the clean glass jar with the tight fitting lid (I recommend placing a new piece of parchment paper between jar and lid for long term storage) or pour into amber dropper bottles.
  7. Label you tincture with the name of the herb, the date you strained it, and the alcohol percentage you used
    • Example: Burdock (Arctium lappa) root tincture, January 11 2021, 40% ABV
  8. Store the tincture in a cool, dark place

Read more about the basic process here

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